Installing DB2 Enterprise v10.1

Extract installer file…

 

Run Prechecks…

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I already solved the first one… See below on how to disable SELinux on your RHEL system.

 

Below that, I’ll show you how to solve the missing packages so we can continue with DB2 installation

 

 

 

 

 


Fully Disabling SELinux

Fully disabling SELinux goes one step further than just switching into permissive mode. Disabling will completely disable all SELinux functions including file and process labeling.

In Fedora Core and RedHat Enterprise, edit /etc/selinux/config and change the SELINUX line to SELINUX=disabled:

# This file controls the state of SELinux on the system.
# SELINUX= can take one of these three values:
# enforcing - SELinux security policy is enforced.
# permissive - SELinux prints warnings instead of enforcing.
# disabled - No SELinux policy is loaded.
SELINUX=disabled
# SELINUXTYPE= can take one of these two values:
# targeted - Only targeted network daemons are protected.
# strict - Full SELinux protection.
SELINUXTYPE=targeted

… and then reboot the system.

(thanks… http://www.crypt.gen.nz/selinux/disable_selinux.html)


Installing dapl…

On my ISO are the various RPM packages I’ll need.  Attempting to install dapl resulted in additional dependencies…

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…installing libibverbs…

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…installing librdmacm…

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and finally… it works

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Installing sg3_utils…

This seems to be a recurring theme any time I play with *nix boxes.. dependencies upon dependencies…

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…installing libsgutils2 which refers to sg3_utils-libs…

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and finally… it works

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I was unable to find an sg_persist package… so I re-ran the db2prereqcheck script… and looks like it is included in one of the packages that were installed… and v10.1.0.0 is ready for installation!

Back to the installation:

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After answering some basic questions like where to install, etc…  it finished!

 

To validate it is running… try this:

ps –eaf | grep –i db2sysc

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To automatically start DB2 instance…

/opt/ibm/db2/V10.1/bin/db2iauto –on db2inst1

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Installing Microsoft SQL 2012

Like many of my step-by-step articles, it’s mostly for corporate level documentation purposes.

I won’t describe every screen, only those that include important decision points that affect my particular use case.

 

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The above dialog is warning me that the firewall does not allow remote database connectivity.  The below command line can be used to open up the SQL port.  The cmd prompt must be opened with administrative permissions for this to work.
netsh advfirewall firewall add rule name = SQLPort dir = inprotocol = tcp action – allow localport = 1433 remoteip = localsubnet profile = DOMAIN

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This is one of those major decision points.  My purpose for this database is to house the newest IBM Endpoint Manager v9 database… nothing else.  So I only require a few items to accomplish this simple task.  The following items are needed for my particular use case:

  • Database Engine Services
    • Full-Text and Semantic Extractions for Search
  • Management Tools – Basic
    • Management Tools – Complete

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In order to get IEM installed properly… an SA account is required. So I’ll configure the database authentication in “Mixed Mode” and specify a password for the SA account.

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That’s all there is to it.  Installations are almost always straight forward… but some corporations require complete step-by-step documentation, I hope this fits the bill.

Installing Windows Server 2012

Recently I’ve had a need to setup a Windows Server 2012 and wanted to document the process for future attempts.

I won’t document every single screen, only those that include decisions to be made and considerations to be considered.

 

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I’ll be using this server as a root server for my new IBM Endpoint Manager v9, so a GUI would be very handy during install and general maintenance of that application.

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At first I wanted to go with a regular install… not Custom… so I chose the top option.

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Turns out this is for upgrading an existing OS installation.  Since this is a brand new hard drive with no pre-existing OS, I should have chosen the “Custom” option.  After hitting Close, I was sent back to the very beginning of the installation.

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Once I arrived at the start up screen… it hung there for nearly 30 minutes.  Turns out since I was setting this up on a VMWare ESXi v5.0 server it doesn’t support Windows Server 2012.  So after some research I came across this article: http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=2006859 

I learned that I had to upgrade my VMWare ESXi server to a patch or v5.1… I opted for v5.1 and was able to get past this sticky part.

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The server manager has been redesigned for the new GUI.  Interesting choices…

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I don’t want this application to come up every time I log in… so choosing the Manager –> Server Manager Properties, I was able to check the “Do not start Server Manager automatically at logon”.

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Now I need to add my new server to my LDAP domain.  Choosing “Local Server” from the left menu…

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Click on “WORKGROUP” and the familiar computer properties dialog opens where you can change these settings.

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One restart later I was able to log in and I’m done.

Installing BigFix.me MDM onto your iOS devices.

The following step-by-step process demonstrates how to install/configure MDM on your iOS devices… iPhones, iPods, and iPads.

1. Visit https://bigfix.me using your mobile device. Step 1 of 13
2. Click "Continue to this website (not recommended)" if prompted. Step 2 of 13
3. Click the "SSL certificate" link towards the bottom. Step 3 of 13
4. Click the "Install" button on the "Install Profile" screen. Step 4 of 13
5. Click the "Install" button on the "Warning" screen. Step 5 of 13
6. If you have a password set, you will need to enter it now and hit "Done". Step 6 of 13
7. Click the "Done" button on the "Profile Installed" screen, you will be returned to Sarfari. Step 7 of 13
8. Enter your email address, choose Device Ownership value and click the "Enroll" button. Step 8 of 13
9. Click the "Install" button on the "Install Profile" screen. Step 9 of 13
10. Click the "Install Now" button within the popup box. Step 10 of 13
11. If you have a password set, you will need to enter it now. Step 11 of 13
12. Click the "Install" button one more time for the "Warning" screen and your done. Step 12 of 13
13. Click "Done" and your all finished. Step 13 of 13

TEM SUA Upgrade 1.3.0.592 –> 1.3.1.597

Lately I released an article on installing Tivoli Endpoint Manager’s add-on product Software Usage Analysis (SUA) v1.3.0.592.  Well… we have release another upgrade and here’s how you can upgrade your installation:

Launching the installation is pretty easy… unlike the initial installation, there is basically one “step”.  Launch the installer:

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Typical license agreement stuff.

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Since this is an upgrade, we are good about warning you that no one will be able to access the GUI interface at this point.

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We’ll need to confirm the user account that is being used for the services here.

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I ran into one little problem where but it was due to service account permissions to the database.  After adjusting them for the duration of this install, the installation continued.

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The installation went well with just the one permissions based hiccup.  To confirm installation was successful simply log into the GUI and look at the bottom right for version and catalogue numbers.

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If you have any questions or comments, please leave them below.

To view all of the images from this upgrade visit:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/danielheth/sets/72157629743080378/

Installing Tivoli Endpoint Manager (BigFix) Console 8.2.1093

My latest installation of the TEM v8.2.1093 server comes with it the installation of the Console.  This new console is extremely cool and has features like LDAP authentication, HTTP communications channel, and more.  Here is the basic step-by-step installation procedure to get the client installed on your workstation.

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If you have any questions, let me know!

Installing Tivoli Endpoint Manager (BigFix) v8.2.1093

imageInstalling this newest version of TEM is relative straight forward and easy to do.  Drawing from my previous articles, a SQL server Installation (and SP1), and the Installing of Pre-requisites, I give you the full installation of v8.2.1093.  I also have downloaded the latest v8.2.1093 version from the TEM website.

I have already attached my new virtual server to my internal Windows Domain so authentication is easily accomplished within my existing network.

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I’m going to remove WebReports from this particular installation, favoring to install it onto a different server for simplicity.

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I will be using a remote database to a different installed instance of SQL server as noted at the top of this article.

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I plan on integrating this newest version of TEM with my Domain.  Thus a generic admin account is exactly what I need here.

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Everything looking good according to the TEM Server Diagnostics tool.  The only error it showed was the resolution of the DNS name used for my new infrastructure.  Now I’ll add a quick little entry in my DNS server for this domain name.

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There we go… that’s better…

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If you have any questions, please them below…

Free Onscreen Ruler

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On occasion I’ve needed the ability to keep track of my location on the screen.  Since I have multiple screens, that typically involved me putting my finger on one screen while clicking or typing on another screen. 

Along time ago I had a small utility which puts a ruler on the screen which I could move around with my mouse.  This was a fantastic utility and very useful.  Today I went looking and found someone wrote a different program which does what I wanted even better.  A Ruler for Windows was written by Rob Latour and available at http://www.arulerforwindows.com/

Here’s my step-by-step installation guide for this utility:

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The installation was so fast, I wasn’t able to get a progress screen… LOL

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Once finished, I’ve launched the application and see this. Now I can have my bank website up on one screen and my Quicken money software up on the other screen… and quickly/easily reconcile my accounts.  Thanks Rob!

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If you have any questions or comments, leave them below!

Migrating Access Data to SQL 2008r2

I recently spent some time building an Access database file full of 2010 US Census data… As an Access database, it’s not very useful since I want to use the data within as a feed for my Windows 8 Metro application.  I’ll need to move this data into my SQL 2008r2 server to make it available to my application.

To do this I’ll be using the Microsoft SQL Server Migration Assistant (SSMA) toolkit I recently installed.

 

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Upon first use, I’ll need to acquire a license for the tool as instructed by the included Readme file.

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After filling out the form, they provide me a file which I will through onto a network file share and give to the tool…

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ok, in the above pic, I didn’t need to specify the filename… just the directory it sat in… then the license imported correctly.

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After specifying the database, I had to give it a minute or so to completely read in and load my database file… the 2010 Census file is right at 100mbs.

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Then specify my SQL server, destination Database name, and my authentication method… I’m in a domain so I’ll simply use Windows Authentication since my Domain account has the appropriate level of access to the SQL Server.

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Yes Please…

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I do not have any pre-existing applications which connected to this Access file… thus no need to link anything.

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Let the Migration begin!

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At this point I could see the connection and the data migration was occurring…

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back on the server, my tables are now created…

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On the Migration Wizard, the data is slowly being copied over…

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This is where my SQL server is running a tad slow… a lot of data being input into the database…

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Wizard complete, and I can see the newly arrived data on the server.

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According to the Migration report… there were Warnings… but no Errors.  The Warnings mostly related to database quality… IE:  some tables did not have primary keys, others had their primary key nullable value configured.

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Those tables with nullable primary keys were corrected to not allow null values.

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Those without primary keys were ignored since SQL server doesn’t consider that a serious problem…

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That and I’m not worried about those two tables considering they were used during the “Import” process from the Census .dp files and won’t be used again.

It’s time to integrate the new found data into my Windows 8 application!

If you have any questions or comments on this, please leave them below!