Installing DB2 Enterprise v10.1

Extract installer file…

 

Run Prechecks…

SNAGHTMLf817c13

I already solved the first one… See below on how to disable SELinux on your RHEL system.

 

Below that, I’ll show you how to solve the missing packages so we can continue with DB2 installation

 

 

 

 

 


Fully Disabling SELinux

Fully disabling SELinux goes one step further than just switching into permissive mode. Disabling will completely disable all SELinux functions including file and process labeling.

In Fedora Core and RedHat Enterprise, edit /etc/selinux/config and change the SELINUX line to SELINUX=disabled:

# This file controls the state of SELinux on the system.
# SELINUX= can take one of these three values:
# enforcing - SELinux security policy is enforced.
# permissive - SELinux prints warnings instead of enforcing.
# disabled - No SELinux policy is loaded.
SELINUX=disabled
# SELINUXTYPE= can take one of these two values:
# targeted - Only targeted network daemons are protected.
# strict - Full SELinux protection.
SELINUXTYPE=targeted

… and then reboot the system.

(thanks… http://www.crypt.gen.nz/selinux/disable_selinux.html)


Installing dapl…

On my ISO are the various RPM packages I’ll need.  Attempting to install dapl resulted in additional dependencies…

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…installing libibverbs…

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…installing librdmacm…

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and finally… it works

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Installing sg3_utils…

This seems to be a recurring theme any time I play with *nix boxes.. dependencies upon dependencies…

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…installing libsgutils2 which refers to sg3_utils-libs…

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and finally… it works

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I was unable to find an sg_persist package… so I re-ran the db2prereqcheck script… and looks like it is included in one of the packages that were installed… and v10.1.0.0 is ready for installation!

Back to the installation:

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After answering some basic questions like where to install, etc…  it finished!

 

To validate it is running… try this:

ps –eaf | grep –i db2sysc

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To automatically start DB2 instance…

/opt/ibm/db2/V10.1/bin/db2iauto –on db2inst1

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BigFix Endpoint Command Polling

Command polling is a feature built into every Tivoli Endpoint Manager endpoint.  This feature instructs endpoints to query their relay for new instructions instead of waiting the UDP ping regarding new actions.

This feature is invaluable when it comes to endpoints that are beyond your DMZ or UDP pings are not allowed.  By activating this task, you can speed up the responsiveness of your endpoints in this ping restricted locations.

Look for the “BES Client Setting: Enable Command Polling” task within the BES Support external site.

My DMZ relay is identified when endpoints communicate with my public domain name: bigfix.me.  When the endpoint talks to this relay I would like them to poll for commands every 45 minutes.  When the endpoints switch to talking to a different relay, I would like them to turn off the polling settings.

To do this I will activate two different actions.  One that is targeted at computers talking to my bigfix.me relay.  A second task will have additional relevance to differentiate them and allow me to turn off polling.

Enable Polling

Activate this action choosing the second take action option which allows us to specify the number of seconds… at 2700 or 45 minutes.

Command Polling 1

Command Polling 2

Next we’ll need to copy the “Relay” global property relevance so we can add a bit of logic to our action.

Command Polling 3

Copy the relevance for “Relay” into the clipboard and hit Cancel to close the Manage Properties window.

Command Polling 4

Returning to the Take Action dialog, specify the Preset = Policy   and select “All Computers” as the target.

Command Polling 5

On the “Applicability” tab we’ll want to modify the relevance and add the following to the end of what is there (copied from the Relay global property):

 AND (if ((it does not contain "127.0.0.1" and it does not contain "::1") of name of registration server) then (name of registration server) else if (exists setting "_BESRelay_PostResults_ParentRelayURL" of client and exists value of setting "_BESRelay_PostResults_ParentRelayURL" of client as string) then (preceding text of first "/" of (following text of first "//" of (value of setting "_BESRelay_PostResults_ParentRelayURL" of client))) else "BES Root Server") as lowercase contains "bigfix.me" AND NOT exists setting "_BESClient_Comm_CommandPollEnable" of client

Command Polling 6

After updating the relevance, we’re ready to hit OK to activate this action.

It will run on all endpoints which have “bigfix.me” within the Relay global property.

Disable Polling

Now that we have this feature getting enabled, we’ll want to disable it where it is not needed.  In other words, when endpoints are talking to any other relay except my “bigfix.me” DMZ relay.

Command Polling 7

Under the Target tab, specify all computers, configure Preset = Policy and update the name so we know this will “Disable Command Polling”.

Command Polling 8

Next we’ll move over to the “Applicability” tab as we did before and add the following slightly modified relevance from before (notice the “does not” at the end):

AND (if ((it does not contain "127.0.0.1" and it does not contain "::1") of name of registration server) then (name of registration server) else if (exists setting "_BESRelay_PostResults_ParentRelayURL" of client and exists value of setting "_BESRelay_PostResults_ParentRelayURL" of client as string) then (preceding text of first "/" of (following text of first "//" of (value of setting "_BESRelay_PostResults_ParentRelayURL" of client))) else "BES Root Server") as lowercase does not contains "bigfix.me" AND exists setting "_BESClient_Comm_CommandPollEnable" of client

Command Polling 9

After updating the relevance, we’re ready to hit OK to activate this action.

Now I will start to receive better response from endpoints communicating through my DMZ relay server.

If you have any questions or comments, please add them to the comments section below.

How to Tattoo your BigFix Endpoints

A large organization utilizing Tivoli Endpoint Manager (BigFix) has many things to do when it comes to organizing your endpoints.

Organization comes in many forms… grouping computers by: Operating System, Processor, Available Disk Space and Last Report Time are all out-of-the-box features of any BigFix infrastructure.  BUT that doesn’t make it very useful for the business side of your organization. 

To help organize your endpoints into business centric groups… we need to utilize a process I call automatic tattooing.  Tattooing endpoints can happen in many ways but they are all triggered off from properties on endpoints.  These properties can be values within INI files somewhere on the file system of your endpoints.  They can also take the form of: is a certain program installed?

For this article I will limit the scope to a few windows properties that are hidden deep within the registry.  In a later article I will help describe the process of a cross-platform tattooing method.

For my purpose I will focus on the RegisteredOrganization and RegisteredOwner string values within HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion of the Registry.

I will create a few things:

1. Two global properties which I can use within WebReports, and to help with targeting actions.

2. A task to make it very easy to configure this value using an action.

Global Properties

Crafting relevance for my two global properties is actually really easy.  In my case I’ll be reading into the registry for the values of my properties as such:

Registered Organization = value "RegisteredOrganization" of key "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion" of native registry

Tattooing 1

Registered Owner = value "RegisteredOwner" of key "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion" of native registry

Tattooing 2

Now let’s implement those within our console. 

Tattooing 3

Click on Tools->Manage Properties, Click “Add New” and specify the “Name:” and “Relevance:”.  If you have more than 100k endpoints, you may want to consider increasing the “Evaluate” property to something like “1 day” or longer.  For my tiny deployment, I will leave it at the default “Every Report”.

Tattooing 5    Tattooing 6

Once the properties have propagated, your endpoints will start to return data…

Tattooing 7

 

Configuration Task

Next up is something a tad more difficult, depending on your experience with creating custom content.  We will create a custom task which will allow us to configure these two registry values.  This task will utilize to very special commands: action parameter query, regset and regset64.  Read more about those in this document.

Let’s start with a new task:

Tattooing 8

Tattooing 9

As anybody who has read my previous articles knows, I like to fill in every blank.  It makes for a better deliverable product to customers.

Tattooing 10

The action script for this task will need to do the following things expressed in sudo-code:

Query the user for the value they want to configure for both properties.

if 64bit OS

    configure 64bit registry values

else

    configure 32bit registry values

validate

After a bit of research, our action script ends up looking like this:

action parameter query "Organization" with description "Please enter the name of your Organization (Ex: Moran IT):" and with default value ""
action parameter query "Owner" with description "Please enter the Owner’s name (Ex: Daniel):" and with default value ""

if {exists x64 of operating system}
    regset64 "[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion" "RegisteredOrganization]" = "{parameter "Organization"}"
    regset64 "[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion" "RegisteredOwner]" = "{parameter "Owner"}"
endif 


regset  "[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion" "RegisteredOrganization]" = "{parameter "Organization"}" 
regset  "[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion" "RegisteredOwner]" = "{parameter "Owner"}"

continue if {(value "RegisteredOrganization" of key "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion" of native registry) = (parameter "Organization")}
continue if {(value "RegisteredOwner" of key "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion" of native registry) = (parameter "Owner")}

Tattooing 11

Of course we can’t forget about a URL with additional detail on this task…

Tattooing 12

The relevance required to do this is actually very simple.  Since only windows computer have a “registry” we can eliminate all non-windows endpoints from running this action with the following relevance:

name of operating system contains "Win"

Tattooing 13

It is highly unlikely that a windows registry will not have the following key, but so we all learn good habits I’ve added the following relevance as well:

exists key "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion" of native registry

Tattooing 14

Let us not forget my article on Properties.

Tattooing 15

It’s been a few minutes and it looks like my fastest computers have already responded with their applicability responses.

Tattooing 16

I won’t go into detail on how to launch this task, I’ve already covered that.  Targeting is way more important to think through and understand how you are going to organize your endpoints.  In later articles I will cover other tattooing methods and how they can benefit your organizations.

For your convenience, here is a zip file containing the content covered in this article:  http://dl.dropbox.com/u/41985632/Content/Configure%20Registered%20Organization%20and%20Owner.zip

If you have any questions or comments, please leave them below.  I’d love to hear about some other tattooing methods and how you implement them within your deployment.

How to use the BigFix Software Distribution Wizard

BigFix is of course now called Tivoli Endpoint Manager a product of IBM.  I’m getting a bit lazy and calling it BigFix for short from now on.

Anyways… This article will provide helpful direction when you want to distribute software within your organization.

I have recently wrote a c# application and want to have it automatically installed across my infrastructure.  When new systems come on-line, I want my application to automatically be installed once it is properly linked into my BigFix infrastructure.  One note to be made when writing your own applications… be sure to properly register your application so you can easily detect that software on your endpoints.  I wrote an article which will show you how to properly register your app when creating your Visual Studio Setup application.

The following screen shots might help you with accomplishing this.

First we’ll need to launch the wizard itself, then specify the application name.

Distribute Windows Software 1

Here we’ll need to specify our MSI installer.  Visual studio creates both a setup.exe and a setup.msi.  the exe is a stand-alone file which creates an environment with which to launch the msi.  IE:  you can distribute the msi all by itself, but if you want to use the exe, you must distribute both the exe and msi files.

BigFix can handle, so if your application has a simple stand-alone exe, then point the wizard to it.  Or the folder or URL of the file in question.  It even has the capability of handling ZIP files.  (if you’d like more info on this, ask me in the comments section below).

Distribute Windows Software 2

Now we’ll need to specify the operating systems that our application will work on.  In my case I want to limit it to newer computers which will have my requirement of .NET to be installed.  Note:  With Windows 8 coming out soon, you may need to modify the relevance of the resulting task in order to install this application onto those endpoints.  As of v8.2 of Tivoli Endpoint Manager, we do not recognize Windows 8.  It appears in the console as “WinUnknown 6.2.8250” for the Consumer Preview Release.

Distribute Windows Software 3

Our next step is to help the wizard “craft” our relevance that will be used for this software distribution task.  Since my application follows proper registration techniques, it is as easy as specifying my executable within the Registered Application box.

Distribute Windows Software 5

Step 5 of our wizard asks us to properly craft the command line that will be used to silently install our application.  Since I’m using an msi installer file that follows Microsoft standards, the defaults are fine.  Otherwise you can change the command line parameters here.  Remember that the end user will NOT see the installer GUI.  So if the installer hangs at a certain step, it will never be noticed and you will have to manually kill the installer before the task will respond with a status.

Distribute Windows Software 6

Complete the wizard by validating the parameters and hitting Finish.

Distribute Windows Software 7

Here we have our newly generated task.  I like to fully customize my tasks, especially when I create something that will become customer facing. 

Thus I’ll work on each tab in order… First we’ll modify the description so the admin launching the task will know what this task is/does and what to expect.

Also remember to modify which site to “save” the task into and which domain it belongs to.  For more on domains, read one of my other articles covering that domains.

I also like to follow naming standards by the BigFix home office, thus on software, I’ll name it as such:  [application name] v[version number] Available

Distribute Windows Software 8

Next I like to include a URL link to the application so if the admin wants additional information or support links it’s as easy as clicking one of the actions.

Distribute Windows Software 9

The Software Distribution Wizard does a great job of creating the basic relevance that will be used.  I, however, like to separate out my relevance for easy reading.  Here I’m separating the OS relevance from my RegApp relevance.  Remember that you can only separate if they are connected by an AND, so be careful!

Distribute Windows Software 10

A final piece of “ribbon” for this task is to specify the various properties.  View my other article on BigFix Task Properties.

Distribute Windows Software 11

And there we have it… If you look under the site you specified and “Fixlets and Tasks” you will see your task.  It is unlikely that any of your endpoints have responded to your new task… therefore you may need to click the “Show Non-Relevant Content” button.

Distribute Windows Software 12

Now that you have the software distribution task created you can Activate it by following this guide.

For your convenience, here is a zip file containing the content covered in this article: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/41985632/Content/ScreenResolutionRuler.zip

If you have any questions or comments, please leave them below.

New BigFix Deployment

When you first setup your Tivoli Endpoint Manager (BigFix) deployment, you will want to enable a few analyses.  These analyses will collect data that can be very helpful when managing your infrastructure as well as troubleshooting and adding customizations.

First up is to activate the BES Component Versions analysis…  You can find a shortcut to this under BigFix Management->Deployment Overview

New Deployment 1

Simply Activate this analysis…

New Deployment 2

And the data will start pouring in.  This information will then be read by various dashboards within the product which help you manage your deployment.

New Deployment 3

Another analysis to be activated is the BES Health Checks Analysis.  This will help you analyze the health and configuration of your deployment.  It provides basic information on the components that make up your infrastructure.  You can find the shortcut to this under BigFix Management->Deployment Health Checks

New Deployment 4

Activate this as well…

New Deployment 5

and you’ll start to see data from this analysis as well.  Just like the first analysis, this one will pull in data and feed that to dashboards within the product.

New Deployment 6

Further down on the Deployment Health Checks dashboard in the Deployment Optimization section is a Warning about activating the BES Relay Status Analysis.  Click that shortcut to activate that as well…

New Deployment 7

New Deployment 8

Just as the others, the data will be pulled in for use by various dashboards.

New Deployment 9

 

If you have any questions or comments, please leave them below.

Tivoli Endpoint Manager (BigFix) Console Requirement

There are a few requirements for the BigFix console to run on your admin machine.  I’ll discuss only one of them here.

Office Web Controls is a Microsoft Office Components requirement which allows us to display charts and graphs within the console.  It can be found here.

The installation of this requirement is relatively easy… here are my screen shots of the process:

Console Req 1

Console Req 2

Console Req 3

Console Req 4

Console Req 5

Console Req 9

Console Req 10

Once the components are installed, you will need to restart your console.  But once you do, the console fills with beautiful shapes and bars.

Console Req 11

If you have any questions about the process or would like to share your comments, please do so below.

If you’d like to see some of the screen shots I skipped in this article, visit http://www.flickr.com/photos/danielheth/sets/72157629877524866/

Installing Tivoli Endpoint Manager (BigFix) Client 8.1.617

Continuing with my installation step-by-step series, I’ll be installing the BigFix client version 8.1.617.0.  This relates to my BigFix Personal Lab infrastructure. 
Get your own trial version of BigFix at the Corp website.

First locate your installer of the client and the corresponding masthead file.  In this step-by-step we’ll be using the EXE and not the MSI version of the installer.

I’ll be installing it onto my root server, a Windows 2008r2 server, however the installation process is the same for the EXE regardless of which Windows OS you’re using except for maybe the UAC dialogs.

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I’ll be installing with the defaults, since I’m happy for the client to be installed onto the C drive for my endpoints.  However you may want to change the installation directory depending on company policies.

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That’s all there is to it.  There are a few validation steps I’ll go over here which will give me the peace of mind that it is functioning properly.

Browse to the clients Logs directory, in my case its “c:\Program Files (x86)\BigFix Enterprise\BES Client\__BESData\__Global\Logs” and look for the todays dated log. 

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You’ll be looking for two very important parts of this log.  The “Attempting to register” which should appear indicating the client itself is working and trying to get to the root server (or relay you specified).  And the “Registered with url” which shows us that it was able to talk to the root server (or relay) and has started the gathering process.

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Please leave your comments and questions below!